i know all

previously zulanglich, pinkiepoop, and sergeantearlgrey

Background art belongs to viivus

 

gavinfreehasruinedmylife:

dont think about ur crush waking up next to you dont think about them in pajamas dont think about them with messy hair and sleepy smiles just. dont. dont do it.

postpunkfaery:

goblinparty:

thefrogman:

tyleroakley:

ideal life

This robot is for a very sick little boy who suffers from eosinophilic esophagitis and anaphylactic shock syndrome. His obesity is a symptom and unrelated to why he must send a robot to school. 
If there are even tiny particles of milk or peanuts in the air, he will end up in the emergency room. He is basically allergic to life and has been in intensive care twice in the last 2 years. This robot allows him to go to school. He can learn, interact with students and teachers, and make friends that aren’t nurses and doctors. 
Sometimes when I tell people I have to work from bed most days, they respond with, “I wish I could do that.” or “That sounds awesome.”
I know this is an easy and obvious joke to make, and I am not admonishing anyone who has made that kind of joke. But I would like people to know that it is hurtful. One of the more hurtful things that is said to me, if I’m being honest. Because I want nothing more than to get out of this bed. And I think this kid would like to play with his friends in real life rather than sending his robot to school. Our lives are not ideal, but we adapt them to make the best out of a bad situation. 

frogman is too polite to say it so i’ll say it for him
shut up tyler oakley

its sad that the title mentions that he is obese because its got nothing to do with his condition. 

postpunkfaery:

goblinparty:

thefrogman:

tyleroakley:

ideal life

This robot is for a very sick little boy who suffers from eosinophilic esophagitis and anaphylactic shock syndrome. His obesity is a symptom and unrelated to why he must send a robot to school. 

If there are even tiny particles of milk or peanuts in the air, he will end up in the emergency room. He is basically allergic to life and has been in intensive care twice in the last 2 years. This robot allows him to go to school. He can learn, interact with students and teachers, and make friends that aren’t nurses and doctors. 

Sometimes when I tell people I have to work from bed most days, they respond with, “I wish I could do that.” or “That sounds awesome.”

I know this is an easy and obvious joke to make, and I am not admonishing anyone who has made that kind of joke. But I would like people to know that it is hurtful. One of the more hurtful things that is said to me, if I’m being honest. Because I want nothing more than to get out of this bed. And I think this kid would like to play with his friends in real life rather than sending his robot to school. Our lives are not ideal, but we adapt them to make the best out of a bad situation. 

frogman is too polite to say it so i’ll say it for him

shut up tyler oakley

its sad that the title mentions that he is obese because its got nothing to do with his condition. 

(Source: tibets)

cranky-crustaceans:

pupukachoo:

froggy-horntail:

pantheonbooks:

duamuteffe:

illesigns:

Pixars 22 Rules of Story Telling

9 is worth the price of admission, holy crap.

This is genius. So many great writing tips!

And this is why Pixar is a master in their field.

Why do I feel so weird reblogging this… this is the weekend dammit!  Anyway, great advice.

Pixar you have no idea how much this actually helps me.

cranky-crustaceans:

pupukachoo:

froggy-horntail:

pantheonbooks:

duamuteffe:

illesigns:

Pixars 22 Rules of Story Telling

9 is worth the price of admission, holy crap.

This is genius. So many great writing tips!

And this is why Pixar is a master in their field.

Why do I feel so weird reblogging this… this is the weekend dammit!  Anyway, great advice.

Pixar you have no idea how much this actually helps me.

mechagod:

this is an experiment I did with one of my pattern ink pieces a few months ago: I drafted up a square filled with ink and deleted the surrounding white space in photoshop with a content-aware filter, this lead photoshop to replicate my pattern in a way that it would continue and expand to the edge of the page.
you can’t really see it here, so I’ve uploaded a high-resolution image here

mechagod:

this is an experiment I did with one of my pattern ink pieces a few months ago: I drafted up a square filled with ink and deleted the surrounding white space in photoshop with a content-aware filter, this lead photoshop to replicate my pattern in a way that it would continue and expand to the edge of the page.

you can’t really see it here, so I’ve uploaded a high-resolution image here

If a painting really works down in your heart and changes the way you see, and think, and feel, you don’t think, ‘oh, I love this picture because it’s universal,’ ‘I love this painting because it speaks to all mankind.’ That’s not the reason anyone loves a piece of art. It’s a secret whisper from an alleyway. Psst, you. Hey kid. Yes you.

This, from The Goldfinch, about art, is how I feel about books. (via irisblasi)

Brain teasers for egalitarians/equalists.

stfufauxminists:

alexandraerin:

Say I’m 32 years old and you’re 22 years old.

In how many years will we be the same age?

Silly question, right? If you define aging as a process that stops at death, the only way we’ll ever be the same age is if I die first. If you don’t, then we’ll never be the same age. Every time you age a year, I also age a year. Since our ages increase at the same rate, you will never catch up to my head start. We have achieved a total equality of aging, but that does not change the permanent inequality of our age.

Okay, say I have a million dollars and you’re completely broke. If we both get a dollar a day, how long will it take you to catch up with me?

Now, this one’s even sillier, because if you have no other resources, your dollar a day is going to be eaten up by basic living expenses that it doesn’t quite meet, and I have an excess of money that can be spent on money-making opportunities that pay off far better than an additional $365 a year. I could literally burn the dollar I’m getting as part of our Totally Equal Income and still make more money in a year than you do just by sticking my money in the bank. 

But still: both of us getting a dollar a day is totally equal, right? It means we’re being treated exactly the same.

And now, final problem:

If we have a world that contains structural inequalities, systemic imbalances, disproportionate danger faced by some, and unequal access to resources and opportunities, is “treating everyone the same” really going to result in equality?

Show your work.

I may have reblogged this already but I don’t care it’s important.

(Source: blue-author)

carryonrnywaywardvagabond:

Fact: Due to lack of sexual attraction, asexuals have more time to bond with natural energy, making them powerful mages.

(Source: sliver0verlord)

Q: Girls are discouraged? That sounds so 1970s.

A: There was a 2001 study that showed in fourth grade, 68% of boys and 66% of girls like science. Starting in sixth, seventh and eighth grade, we lose girls and boys, but we lose more girls and for different reasons: lingering stereotypes, societal pressures. It’s well known that many girls have a tendency to dumb down when they’re in middle school. Just last week, I was talking to senior executives, and a woman told me that she was the best biology student in high school and had the highest exam scores. At the end of the semester, a teacher told her: “I’m sorry, but I’m going to have to give the award in biology to a boy, because it’s more important to him.” Almost every time that I give a speech or meet with a group of women, I’ll hear such stories.

Q: Boys earn 70% of the D’s and F’s in school and account for 80% of dropouts. Shouldn’t we fear more for their future?

A: It’s a big problem. Women earn the majority of undergraduate degrees in the U.S. and last year earned more Ph.D.s than men. But keeping girls in the science and math pipeline is a separate problem with different causes. It’s important we address both. You don’t stop research on breast cancer just because heart disease is also deadly. You work on both.

Q: Suppose you were an executive of a corporation that needs engineers. You meet a girl in high school. She scored in the 99th percentile in math on her SATs, yet says she wants to major in psychology or go to law school, because those careers sound more interesting. What do you tell her?

A: I’d introduce her to the coolest female engineer in the company. Girls tend to have a stereotype of engineers being 65-year-old guys who wear lab coats and pocket protectors and look like Einstein. Try to make it personal to them and show them some of the cool things that they can do in engineering.

Q: Let’s talk Lawrence Summers. The Harvard president recently resigned after giving a controversial speech a year ago suggesting that men might simply be predisposed to be better at math and science. Is there at least a grain of truth in what he said?

A: (Laughs). Suppose you came across a woman lying on the street with an elephant sitting on her chest. You notice she is short of breath. Shortness of breath can be a symptom of heart problems. In her case, the much more likely cause is the elephant on her chest.

For a long time, society put obstacles in the way of women who wanted to enter the sciences. That is the elephant. Until the playing field has been leveled and lingering stereotypes are gone, you can’t even ask the question.

Q: I will anyway. There are many obvious biological differences between men and women. This can’t be one?

A: There are obvious differences, but until you eliminate the more obvious cause, it’s difficult to get at the question scientifically. Look at law, medicine and business. In 1970 — that’s not ancient history — law school was 5% female, med school was 8% and business school was 4%. You could have taken a look at those numbers and concluded that women don’t make good lawyers or doctors. The statistics might have supported you. But today, all of those fields are about 50-50.

Sally Ride (the first American woman in space) giving awesome answers to insipid questions in this interview.  (via itsawomansworld2)